Green Wave Gazette Reaches Tens of Thousands

Most read stories between 2013 to 2020

The+Green+Wave+Gazette+is+a+student+newspaper+club+at+Abington+High+School.+It+has+published+work+by+students+for+almost+two+decades.+In+2019-2020%2C+the+online+newspaper+was+named+a+distinguished+site+by+SNO.

Patricia Pflaumer

The Green Wave Gazette is a student newspaper club at Abington High School. It has published work by students for almost two decades. In 2019-2020, the online newspaper was named a distinguished site by SNO.

Patricia Pflaumer, Advisor

The Green Wave Gazette club at Abington High School supports student voice. It began in 2002 with Mrs. Crowley, the high school librarian, as the advisor. It then went to Ms. Pflaumer (co-advisor and advisor), Ms. Pearsons (co-advisor), and Mr. Dorman (advisor). In 2017, Ms. Pflaumer returned.

The paper had a big shift in 2013 under Mr. Dorman when it moved from using ASNE (American Society of Newspaper Editors) as the online host to SNO (School Newspapers Online). It was also published in print a few times per year.

During that first year with SNO, some of the events the paper covered were the 50th birthday of the old high school, the year passage since the Marathon Bombings, the Coombs Race, tragedies in town, high school and pro sports, school news, reviews, teacher spotlights, student spotlights, opinions, and more. Not much has changed in the topics students cover. Yet, so much has changed.

In 2019-2020, the students at the high school produced over 150 stories. Their stories received tens of thousands of views, according to Google Analytics.

Although there were many new stories, sometimes older stories trended.  Wheelies Are Wheelie Fun by Christian Waterman had 392 views and Scotland Says Nay to Independence by Ian McLeod had 370 views this year.

Looking at Google Analytics for the articles written since 2013 with the most readers, these 19 each have had over 1,000 views. Worth noting is that one, #11 by Elizabeth Roy, was just published this month.

All of these are worth another read, not only because they are well-written, but because the students captured a moment of time in history.

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