Taekwondo Lessons Over Zoom

How Abington senior Sophia Villano continues teaching during this crisis

Sophia+Villano+preparing+to+virtually+stream+a+lesson+at+the+Boston+Taekwondo+dojo%2C+in+Abington+Massachusetts%2C++on+Thursday%2C+May+7%2C+2020

Courtesy Sophia Villano

Sophia Villano preparing to virtually stream a lesson at the Boston Taekwondo dojo, in Abington Massachusetts, on Thursday, May 7, 2020

Cameron Curney, Production Manager

ABINGTON -As the public became more aware of the severity of the COVID-19 virus, life began to drastically change.  Health officials began to preach social distancing, and the use of online communications became more prevalent than ever.

Similar to her peers, Abington High School senior Sophia Villano has felt the affects of this transition in her school work.  More unique to her however, has been the transition at her after school job.  Working as a taekwondo instructor, at the Boston Taekwondo dojo, located in Abington.

Villano explains, “since the end of March we’ve been doing classes remotely.”

Before the COVID-19 outbreak Villano could find her classes ranging from “10 to 30 people.”  Now she sees, “around 6 or 7.  Which is kinda small, but I mean its more than the Facebook live when we had like 1.  It’s a real jump,” she said.

I would just kinda be talking to a camera in my living room and it was just like really really weird.  Then we made the move to Zoom, and now its not as weird, But honestly its still pretty weird.”

— Sophia Villano

Initially Villano felt that the online classes were a bit awkward: “At first it was because we were doing classes on Facebook live, and I couldn’t see the students.  I would just kinda be talking to a camera in my living room and it was just like really really weird.  Then we made the move to Zoom, and now its not as weird, But honestly it’s still pretty weird.”

Compared to a regular class Villano explains, “We pretty much teach them the exact same things we’d teach on a regular night.  We have a basic curriculum.  Both a normal night and now these Zoom classes include a warm-up, stances, the older kids know how to do these, but the little kids don’t really so I have to kinda show them how, then its kicks, then we do forms.”

Some difficulties Villano has during this transition period have included, “Having to do forms backwards because the camera flips” her image.  She initially thought communication might be difficult since she wouldn’t be seeing parents as much, but she’s been relieved that hasn’t really been the case. Villano explains, “I’ve had a couple parents Facebook message me and ask, oh what’s up with classes?  And I’ll tell them, here’s everything.  And send them the Zoom link and code.”

Villano said,  “I definitely prefer in person classes, over online ones, but I understand that it’s a crisis.”

For more information on Boston Taekwondo, check out their website here.

 

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